Category Archives: Uncategorized

In-between the raindrops

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April was a very difficult month to accomplish any small projects, due to frequent heavy rain storms. It seemed that just about the time the ground was drying up another storm would roll in. Despite the rain we did manage to do some bunker repairs, subsurface drainage repairs, remove several dead trees and plant replacements. Hopefully better weather in May will allow us some time to scratch a few more projects off the list.

February Thaw

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Activity on dormant turf does damage

 

We are heading into a warm weather pattern for the next week which undoubtedly triggers everyone’s desire to play some golf.  Unfortunately, we still have frost in the ground so we will not be opening the course anytime soon. Extensive damage to the golf course turf is inevitable if we allow play during the transition to spring. We strive to provide the highest quality playing conditions and allowing play too early would be counter-productive to maintaining that standard.

 

2017 Preparations Underway

Early December snowstorms and frigid temperatures have moved most of our activities indoors for now. Equipment Technician Don Fort is busy sharpening cutting units and servicing all of our equipment so it is ready to go in the spring. We are also repairing ball washers, tee markers and other signage followed by a fresh coat of paint in preparation for the 2017 golf season.

Our staff would like to thank all of our Abbey Springs members for providing us with a great place to work and are wishing you and your families a Merry Christmas and a prosperous New Year.

 

The Fall Rush

The fall season is always a very busy time for the maintenance staff. It is a time when our mowing schedule slows down and we can concentrate on accomplishing a multitude of projects. Recently we have been installing subsurface drainage lines to aid in drying up areas that are negatively affected by too much moisture.  Leaf removal is a huge undertaking on the course, common areas and within the condominium units. We also have to prepare the golf course for the winter which includes aerifying, topdressing and pesticide applications to protect our turf from winter fungal diseases.

No more runaway putts

This is one of the small projects we completed this week. The approach to the 10th green has long been a golfers nightmare. Any putt rolling toward the front of the green would likely end up back in the fairway 30 yards away from the green requiring a chip shot back onto the green.

We removed about twenty feet of sod from in front of the green and added soil to raise the approach about twelve inches. The sod was put back into place and roped off to protect it until a new root system can be established. The ten feet of approach closest to the green is now almost level with the putting surface and will be cut at collar/approach height. This will prevent any balls from taking off down the hill and ending in the fairway.

Aeration that golfers can love

 

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Unloading 49,000 lbs of dried sand for greens aeration.

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This process creates holes in the green using pressurized water and simultaneously filling the holes with sand using this machine.

 

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This is a profile of a putting green after using this one-step process to aerate, amend the soil and topdress the surface.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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This is the putting green after sweeping in the excess sand and rolling. The green is ready for play with minimal surface disruption allowing the ball to roll true and smooth.

Total tee times lost is just one day. Now thats something golfers, marketing teams and accountants can love.

Slice through the stress

 

This week we aerated the greens with a machine that uses vertically mounted blades that cut through the putting green surface creating 3 1/2″ deep slits. The objective is to allow for efficient gas exchange and water infiltration as well as stimulate root growth and reduce compaction. The putting surface disruption is minimal and no longer detectable after the next mowing.  Cultural practices like this are very helpful in maintaining healthy greens particularly during stressful weather conditions like we have experienced lately.

 

Mid-Season Stress Relief

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This is not your ordinary aerator. This unit is called a Hydroject, it uses water under extremely high pressure to make a hole in the soil a 1/16″ in diameter and about 8″ deep. It creates fissures in the soil that improve percolation, gas exchange and compaction relief. We use this method of aerating in mid-season because it creates minimal disruption to the playing surface yet provides some stress relief for the turf.